• Sep,25, 2022

Yoga For Swimmers

Yoga For Swimmers

Yoga may help relieve tension in the shoulders and upper back and lessen the effects of swimming. Yoga enhances flexibility, range of motion, and strength. Since both yoga and swimming use coordinated movements with the breath, the yoga breath awareness will transition well into swimming.

Beneficial Poses for Swimmers

 

Yoga for swimmers focuses on shoulders, shoulder blades, hips, and ankles. Swimming puts a lot of strain on the shoulders and the hips and feet. The following poses are suitable for swimmers.

 

Downward Facing Dog

Downward Dog not only stretches the shoulders, chest, and hamstrings, but it also strengthens the upper body and relieves stress. Begin by getting down on your hands and knees. Tuck your toes beneath and rise to Down Dog with your hands firmly on the ground. 

Stretch the back and legs slowly at the beginning. Draw your shoulder blades inside and lower them by turning your upper arms outwards. Keep your spine straight and your tailbone pointing up to the sky. If necessary, bend your knees to maintain the length of your spine. Take 5 deep breaths and hold them.

 

Bow Pose

Bow Pose strengthens the back muscles while opening and stretching the front of the body. Begin by laying down on your stomach and bringing your hands to your sides. Bring your heels up to your buttocks and grab your ankles. 

Maintain a hip-width distance between your feet. As you inhale, push your feet into your hands, raising your legs and chest while arching your back. Keep your shoulder blades tight to your spine at all times.

Stay for 2 to 4 breaths before gently descending. If it seems comfortable, repeat 2 to 3 times more. If the full versions seem too hard, you may perform one side at a time, the Half Bow.

Toe Stretch

Tuck your toes beneath and go down on your hands and knees. Don't forget about your small toes; they may need assistance tuck beneath. Walk your hands towards your knees as you gently sit your hips back over your heels. 

Staying here with your hands on the floor is an option. To advance, sit up straight with your hands on your thighs and your complete body weight on your heels. Sit tall and take a deep breath.

This is a challenging posture! It's OK if you can only sit for five breaths at the start. Begin where you are and work your way up to 1-2 minutes. There's a vast difference between being uncomfortable and being in agony. Stop if you have intense discomfort in your knees, ankles, or feet.

 

Extended Puppy Pose

Begin on all fours, hips over knees, shoulders over wrists. Feet equally pressed down. Bring your hands in front of you as you lower your head to the mat. Keep hips above knees. Arms actively stretch forward, shoulder-distance apart. 

If you have sensitive shoulders, keep your hands broader. Hands dig into the mat. The triceps and biceps work together to expand the upper back. The chest dissolves toward the mat. 5-10 deep breathes.

 

Conclusion

Swimming and yoga both try to pull the senses within. We may surrender to the present moment when we work with the breath and bodily movement.

Yoga and swimming encourage relaxation, inner awareness and being present with the body. Let both activities benefit from one other.

 

Sarah Williams

Hot Yoga Instructor